How to Save and Reuse Crystallized Honey | White Lake Farms Along the Wasatch Front in Utah

How to Save and Reuse Crystallized Honey


If you’re unfamiliar with the molecular makeup of honey, then you may think crystallized honey is honey gone bad. That couldn’t be farther from the truth. Crystallization is honey’s natural way of preserving itself.

Despite its liquid appearance, honey has a low moisture content that deters bacteria and yeast. If you were to look at a bowl of white sugar, you could see thousands of small crystals. When you look at cloudy or thick honey, you can also see sugar crystals. The only difference is that the honey crystals clump together.

All honey will eventually crystallize. There are many factors that contribute to crystallization including the type of flower or plant the bees gathered the pollen from to make the honey. Temperature also plays a part. It’s best to store your honey around 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Colder temperatures will increase the rate of crystallization while warmer temperatures will degrade the honey.

If your honey has crystallized, you can make it smooth and golden once again.
  1. Simply heat a pan of water with low heat.
  2. Remove the pan from the stove and place your honey jar inside. Be sure to take the lid off your jar before placing it in the warm water.
  3. Now, all you have to do is let the honey sit until it softens.
  4. Once the honey has come to a liquid state, put the lid back on and shake the jar. You may need to use an oven mitt or wrap the jar in a towel.
  5. It’s just as important to cool your honey slowly as it is to heat it slowly. You’ll want to place the honey back in the warm water, make sure there is enough water to reach the top of the honey line in the jar.
  6. Let the water and the honey cool together. If you can touch the water and it’s the same temperature as the room then your honey is ready.

A word of caution:
You may be tempted to heat the honey faster or simply put it in the microwave, but high temperatures (over 118 degrees) can remove the vitamins and nutrients naturally found in honey.  Also, heating and cooling too quickly can increase the crystallization process.
White Lake Farms  |  Pure Raw Honey from the Wasatch Front in Utah  |  801-361-2246  |  info@whitelakefarms.com